Visitor's Questions
Last update: Wednesday, 6 June 2012
Visitor's Questions

Questions & Answers

We encourage you to talk with your doctor or nurse about any medical questions you may have.

We receive many comments from visitors to our site. These comments are very helpful to us. They allow us to improve the web site content. Some suggestions help us identify the next content areas we need to develop.

Please note, some suggestions for additional content cannot be included because they are culturally or scientifically inappropriate.

We also receive many health-related and/or Native American-related questions. The questions are referred to scientific or cultural experts. Responses may take a week or more to be posted. Unfortunately, we are not able to answer all questions.

Please note:

  • Some questions are too specific to one person and would be inappropriate for another person.
  • Sometimes the question is too vague or does not include enough information.
  • The question is already answered somewhere else in the web site.
  • Some questions are similar to others. We may group questions and give one answer.

Resources on our website may be used free of charge. We do request that credit be given to Native American Cancer Research, Corp. when presenting these resources.



Subject: "Cancer Pain"

Question:
I HAVE DOCETAXEL RESISTANT PROSTATE CANCER I received radiation therapy a few hours ago on the area of left 5,6 vertebra, becuse of pain in left arm. Now the pain is very stromg, probably because swelling in the area pinching the nerves. How long is that acute exacerbation Solymoss

Answer:
Left arm pain should not be caused by radiation to the spine unless it was his cervical (neck) spine. He should call his oncologist (either radiation or medical oncologist). He may need steroids to reduce inflammation.
AB
posted: 9·20·2011



Subject: "Cancer Pain"

Question:
Can we learn something from how people cope with pain in the Sundance, that may apply to our pain?
peace, Dogheart

Answer:
I believe that we human beings are physical, emotional, mental and spiritual...when we feel physical pain we are in our physical body...which effects our emotional, mental and spiritual selves... When a person is Sundancing...the goal is to be in prayer...to focus on our spiritual selves...with days of dancing...praying...and fasting...they gradually work up to being into their spiritual bodies...

When a person reaches this goal they are no longer in their physical body...they are in their spirital body and do not feel pain...or thirst...or hungar etc... This is a time when they can have visions...dreams...answers...songs etc...its a true "natural high"...

When they have completed Sundance...it takes about 4 days to gradually come back to their physical body...and can know the same pain they had prior to the Sundance (unless they were healed by Sundancing)...

Too...some people Sundance and never leave their physical body and suffer tremendously...there are SOME change...but not at the extent it could be if they totally go into their spiritual self...

So yes...I believe that going totally into our spiritual body is another way to eleviate pain...it doesn't have to be as drastic as Sundancing though...Sundancing is one way...there are other...less sacrificing ways to accomplish this....
CT
posted: 7·12·2011



Subject: "Cancer Pain"

Question:
A friend of ours has stage 4 esophageal cancer that has spread to his liver. The liver is where his pain is. He did 6 rounds of chemo and it shrank all of his tumors. 2 1/2 months with no iv chemo (just pills) and his tumors grew and he got a new one. They started him on another chemo, but after the 2nd round he had severe pain in his liver area. My friend thinks this means the chemo is working. Some of us are worried that it means it isn't working and the tumors are growing. He is not due for another cat scan for 4 weeks. (He was already a stage 4 when the cancer was discovered.) We do not want to overstep our bounds on what to say or not to say but we are worried. I just want to know. Would the severe pain (worse than he's ever had) mean that the chemo is killing the cancer?

Answer:
Pain is not a predictor either of response or progression on the new treatment. The severity of the pain means he needs help in managing that until a decision is made about whether the new treatment is effective.
JSK
posted: 4·25·2007



Subject: "Cancer Pain"

Question:
My husband has lung cancer. His skin hurts so badly. His ribs hurt. He can't even move. Pain medications don't help. Is he most likely at the end of his time?

Answer:
The National Cancer Institute has a fact sheet titled, End-of-Life: Questions and Answer. Question number four asks, "What are the signs that death is approaching? What can the caregiver do to make the patient comfortable?"

You can find this fact sheet that also includes links to other sources of information about end-of life care at http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Support/end-of-life-care/

Since your husband's pain is not controlled, contact with his provider to request an increase his pain medication. There may be other alternatives to control pain the doctor can consider. If your husband is not able to take treatment for the cancer, hospice would be very helpful with pain management and other symptoms.

To find out more about hospice and if there is a hospice in your area visit the Hospice Foundation of America website at http://www.hospicefoundation.org/ You may also wish to call Native Circle and inquire about the Spirit of Eagle's efforts to make hospice care more available to Native People. Toll free: (877) 372-1617.
posted: 4·10·2007



Subject: "Cancer Pain"

Question:
My mom had pancreatic cancer. She had a Whipple, radiation and chemo. One and a half years later she is cancer free. However, she is an alcoholic, smoker, and is now malnourished and in constant pain. She was taking oxycodone. The Dr. switched her to ultram. She won't get out of bed and won't eat. She defecates and won't get help with cleaning herself because she feels bad. The doctors have no idea why she is in pain. We have no idea what to do. Please help.

Answer:
Your mom needs to be referred to a pain specialist to determine the cause of pain (post-op scar, non-cancer arthritis, etc).
JSK

Also, you may wish to go back to the doctor or clinic with your mom and ask if she can get a referral to a pain specialist. It's not unusual for an elder to try to be strong and not admit to the doctor that they are in a great deal of pain. Your mom may communicate her pain to you in a number of ways and then not talk to the doctor about it. If you or a family member goes to the appointment with your mom, you can help her describe how her pain is affecting her life and help write down and remember the doctor's recommendations. Also, keep in mind, that your mom may be having a bad reaction to the new medication. I called a pharmacist and reviewed your comment with her. The pharmacist was concerned that your mom may be drinking alcohol while taking the ultram, which would not be good and could be causing some of the problems she is having. Even more dangerous would be mixing oxycodone with alcohol which could be a reason the doctor decided to switch medications. A person can feel helpless when a parent is hurting. It's important that they take good care of themselves during this time as well. AB
posted: 3·07·2007



Subject: "Cancer Pain"

Question:
I have been taking the same pain medication for the past 3-4 years and it has gotten to where it does not work. I asked my provider to increase it, which is reasonable, I only have been taking Lorcet 7.5 2x day, although a surgeon had put me on Lorcet 10 4x day and then took it down to 7.5 3x day. Obviously since it was a surgeon, my primary care practitioner is supposed to continue my pain management., when I asked him to increase my meds, he refuses to give me any more refills at all and says he will refer me to a pain clinic, which was 2 months ago and there still has been no pain clinic faxed a referral about me and the doc still will not refill my meds, any of them, although I am changing doctors, (this one will not even return any of my calls, nurses either) in the mean time I still have to suffer, what can I do?

Answer:
You don't say what you have been told about what is causing your pain. Have you got active cancer? Surgeons only prescribe narcotics for short term post operative pain. If you have an oncologist, that person may be better qualified to assess and treat your pain than a primary care practitioner. You have a right to know what your pain is caused by and what can be done to treat it. We hope by now you have gotten your referral to the pain clinic and found resolution to your pain.
JSK
posted: 3·07·2007



Questions & AnswersTop of Page

Subject: "Treatment / Ceremony"

Question:
Why a traditional ceremony?

Response:
The information on our web page called, "Should I Do Traditional Ceremony Before My Treatment Begins?" is based on feedback received from hundreds of interviews with Native American Cancer Survivors. Native survivors repeatedly share with us that one of the unexpected gifts that the experience of cancer has brought to them is a deeper connection with the Creator, a deepened spirituality and sometimes a strengthening of appreciation of traditional ways.

Many survivors from the Network have told us that they felt it was important to take part in some type of spiritual ceremony. Some patients prefer to do traditional Indian ceremonies and others prefer organized religious ceremonies. To date, traditional Indian healers have been very flexible when working with Native cancer patients. For example, if the patient wants to do ceremony that requires several month's preparation, or includes a lot of fasting, limited water intake, and other vigorous physical challenges, the advice is to have a family member do that ceremony for the patient. The type of preparation may have serious problems for the patient's western medical treatment. At a minimum, almost all of the survivors from the Network do take part in spiritual health and even those who went through a short ceremony felt they went into treatment in a strong, balanced way. These patients also felt stronger spiritually and more at ease or accepting of their current health situation. They also felt that they healed better after having even the brief ceremony.
AB & LB
posted: 6·27·2007


Questions & AnswersTop of Page

Subject: "Chemotherapy / Side Effects"

Question:
CPT 11 and Avastin are being intravenously given to my husband. He has been taking it every two weeks since Dec 28. Doing well, but terrible skin rash and itching. Anything we can do to help and is this caused by the Chemo?

Answer:
Skin changes, skin rashes and itching are common side effects of many chemotherapy drugs. Managing these side effects can be hard if they are drug-related. Be sure to talk with your healthcare provider about whether or not skin problems are caused by the drugs as specific treatments may be needed. There is no one treatment for skin problems. If the rash and itching are due to dry skin or other non-treatment causes, local measures such the use of lotions without perfume or the suggestions below may be helpful. Further information and ideas on how to manage this side effect can be found on our website at www.natamcancer.org/page69.html. Another tip recommended by the National Cancer Institute has to do with laundry detergent. Many of the additives in laundry detergent and fabric softeners can be especially irritating to skin that is sensitive during chemo and can make itching worse. Try adding clear vinegar about 1 cup per load to the laundry rinse cycle or try using a mild laundry soap sold for washing baby clothes. If you use dryer sheets, make sure they are unscented. It also may be helpful to wear loose-fitting, lightweight cotton clothing and to use cotton bed sheets.
AB/LUK
posted: 6·16·2008



Subject: "Chemotherapy / Side Effects"

Question:
Why shouldn't you shave your armpits or legs during chemo?

Answer:
During chemo you can get infections more easily than usual. Shaving could cause you to nick yourself or cause skin irritation that could lead to an infection. It is best not to shave when your white count or platelet count is low. Talk with your healthcare provider about when it is okay and safe to shave.
AB/LUK
posted: 6·16·2008



Subject: "Chemotherapy"

Question:
What are the effects on a person going with someone every time, and sitting next to them during their Chemo sessions?

Answer:
The potential effects of going with a friend or loved one and sitting next to them during their chemo treatments are many:

  1. You may deepen your relationship.
  2. You may catch a feeling of deep joy from the help you are giving.
  3. You may have moments of short-term boredom, tiredness or sadness from the environment and dealing with a difficult illness.
  4. You may never really know how much your help and presence means to the person even though they thank you many times.
  5. You may be setting a good example to others in your family and community of the value of helping others through tough times.
  6. You are not at risk of catching cancer. Cancer is not contagious.
  7. You are not at risk from any of the chemo or medications given.
  8. One thing you can do to protect yourself and the cancer patient from germs is to wash your hands or use hand sanitizer before, during and after leaving the chemo suite.
  9. If you get a cold or other illness during the time you are taking the person to chemo appointments be sure to let someone else take over for you. The cancer patient receiving chemo can catch illnesses from you more easily.
Let us know if you experience any additional effects and best wishes to you and the person you are helping! AB
posted: 6·13·2008



Subject: "Chemotherapy"

Question:
If chemotherapy is not helpful, what's next?

Answer:
There are many different drugs and drug combinations to try. When one does not work, another may. Another possibility may be enrollment in a clinical trial. Your healthcare provider may also consider a combination of therapies. Unfortunately, sometimes there are no effective treatments and comfort care through hospice can be considered. Please talk with your healthcare provider about all possible options.
LUK & AB
posted: 3·22·2008



Subject: "Chemotherapy"

Question:
I still suffer from bone pain, chronic fatigue three years after chemo - is this normal?

Answer:
It is hard to know what is going on, not knowing your diagnosis, treatment or current status of disease. Fatigue can last for many years after the end of treatment. Bone pain could last a long time; I would discuss these issues with your healthcare provider who has knowledge of your medical history and is best suited to work with you to provide symptom relief.
LUK
posted: 3·22·2008



Subject: "Chemotherapy"

Question:
During chemo, should grapefruit juice be avoided?

Answer:
For some drugs, grapefruit and grapefruit juice should be avoided because they can increase the side effects of the drug you are taking. (This is true for non-cancer drugs as well.) It is best to discuss your specific drugs and the possible interaction between the drug and grapefruit with your healthcare provider and/or pharmacist. As a rule of thumb, if you are taking a drug that could interact with grapefruit, you should stay away from any grapefruit containing products for 3 days before and 3 days after you take the drug. This means that if you take a daily pill that could interact with grapefruit that should avoid all of these products for as long as you are taking the drug. New information is being learned daily.
LUK
posted: 3·22·2008



Subject: "Chemotherapy / Diarrhea and Constipation"

Question:
My Father has had 4 rounds of 5 days of chemo for Esophagel cancer. He is now loosing control of urinating and bowel movement. He said that when hegoes to urinate it just comes from his bowels also. Is this a side effect ofchemo or is something else going on? It has been going on for about 5 days now.

Answer:
-You need to contact your father's healthcare provider about this as soon as possible. It may be that the chemo or antiemetics (anti nausea medications for the chemo) are causing diarrhea and the bearing down to urinate is also causing diarrhea flow as well. Some chemos have diarrhea as a side effect and it can be life threatening. The other possibility is that the patient has a metastatic spread of cancer to the spinal cord that is causing loss of bowel and bladder function. Your father needs to be evaluated by the doctor as soon as possible.
LUK
posted: 3·6·2008



Subject: "Chemotherapy / Side Effects"

Question:
What are the side-effects, individually and/or cumulatively, of Taxol/Carboplatin/Avastin?

Answer:
A very helpful, extensive web resource on these and most other chemotherapy drugs can be found at www.chemocare.com. Click on the section called, "Chemotherapy Drugs" to find each of the drugs you have asked about. This website was founded by the Olympic Gold Medal Skater, Scott Hamilton, who is a survivor of testicular cancer. The chemotherapy information there can be particularly helpful because, in addition to listing the side effects, it also has a section for each drug on when you should contact your health care professional, and helpful self-care tips for managing the side effects of each medication.

posted: 3·6·2008



Subject: "Chemotherapy / Reduce SE during Chemo"

Question:
What is the name of the IV antinausea medication used?

Answer:
There are a variety of medications used to treat the nausea you may have if you receive cancer treatment. Your healthcare provider should talk with you about the possibility of having nausea; not all treatments cause nausea and each person's body responds to the treatments individually so that even when a treatment causes nausea, you may not have any, may have a little or may have a lot. Your healthcare provider will work with you to find the best antinausea medicine for you based on the treatment you will receive.
LUK
posted: 12·10·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy / Chemo Drugs and SE"

Question:
How long does stomach upset last after chemo is over?

Answer:
Most nausea is for the first few days to a week after the chemo. It depends a lot on which drugs are used. If heartburn is the problem, it often helps to use over the counter medications like pepcid or zantac and to avoid foods that have high acid, alcohol, chocolate, etc.

posted: 12·10·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy / Chemo Drugs and SE"

Question:
My two year old son had his last dose of Vincristine on 18 October and still has weak muscle tone in his legs. How long will this last for?

Answer:
It is too soon to see improvement after the last Vincristine. In fact the symptoms are often the worst right after all the treatment is done. If prednisone was also part of the treatment, as it is with many childhood cancers, that can also contribute to the weakness. Check with your pediatric oncologist about how to help your little one recover more quickly.
JSK
posted: 12·10·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy / Reduce SE After Chemo"

Question:
It has been 10 months since my last chemo treatment and I still have very tender feet and hands. I can't even scratch my daughter's back or stand for my feet to be touched. What can be done about this?

Answer:
If the drug you received was a taxane (Taxol or Taxotere), the sensitivity is worst in the first year but should be gradually getting better. Avoid tight shoes, extreme temperatures for hands and feet. If you are diabetic, work with your doctor to improve diabetic control to help the nerve endings heal faster.
JSK
posted: 12·10·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy / Chemo Drugs and SE"

Question:
My hubby has been having chemo for non small cell lung cancer. He had chemo in his first year after he was diagnosed plus radiotherapy. The radio therapy shrunk the tumor a little which is attached to his heart and there is a tumor thrombosis in his right anterim of the heart. This year the third year the tumor has begun to grow, hence more chemo. He has had 8 doses over 16 weeks. He feels tired, has no energy, is breathless after the slightest movement. His appetite is good despite a metallic taste in his mouth most of the time. He has been on clexane injections while he has been having chemo and is not being weaned off this and onto warfarin tablets. When do the side effects of chemo start to go. His skin is dry. He has lost muscle tone in his bottom and legs. His toes feel tingly sometimes. His hands and feet feel cold sometimes. Will this shortness of breath and not being able to exert himself wear off?

Answer:
Side effects from chemo and radiation therapy lessen over time, taking up to a year or more for some side effects; particularly fatigue (being very, very tired). Some side effects, such as numbness or tingling in the toes, may lessen but not totally go away. The metallic taste usually goes away in a few months and may be gradual or just a sudden sense that the metallic taste is gone. If there is shortness of breath, it is important that the healthcare provider is aware of it and how much it interferes with doing daily activities (or any kind of activity). Some light exercise would be helpful, again with the guidance of your provider. Trying to walk a bit more and light "weight lifting" with soup cans or very light weights might increase muscle tone and build stamina. Use pillows to sit on for comfort.
LUK
posted: 12·10·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy / Chemo Side Effects / Anemia and Neutropenia"

Question:
What are the effects of anemia?

Answer:
Anemia is a condition in which the number of red blood cells is below normal. The main job of red blood cells is to pick up oxygen as they travel through blood vessels in the lungs. The red blood cells then carry the oxygen throughout our body and to our brain. When the red blood count is low, as in anemia, our body is not getting the oxygen needed to function as it should. The main symptom of most types of anemia is fatigue. Others symptoms of anemia include weakness, pale skin, a fast or irregular heartbeat, shortness of breath, chest pain, dizziness, and problems with thinking clearly, numbness or coldness in your hands and feet, and headache. When anemia starts, it can be so mild that it is hardly noticed. But, the symptoms can increase to where it can become difficult to function. If you notice these symptoms during or after having chemotherapy, be sure to discuss them with your oncologist or oncology nurse. Also see the section of our website on managing fatigue at fatigue-cancer
AB
posted: 7·28·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy / Chemo Side Effects"

Question:
Is it safe for children to be around people being treated with chemotherapy?

Answer:
There is no risk to a child to be around a person being treated with chemotherapy.

However, the question should also be asked,
"Is it safe for a person who is being treated with chemotherapy to be around children?"

Children are often exposed to and carry many germs. Chemotherapy can weaken the immune system and make a person more likely to get infections. This happens because most anticancer drugs affect the bone marrow, making it harder to make white blood cells, the cells that fight many types of infections.

A person receiving chemotherapy should keep in mind the following guidance from the National Cancer Institute to help avoid infections:

  • Stay away from people who have illnesses you can catch, such as a cold, the flu, measles, or chicken pox.
  • Try to avoid crowds. For example, go shopping or to the movies when the stores or theaters are least likely to be busy.
  • Stay away from children who recently have received "live virus" vaccines such as chicken pox and oral polio, since they may be contagious to people with a low blood cell count.
  • Wear protective gloves when gardening or cleaning up after others, especially small children.
  • Call your doctor or local health department if you have any questions.
For more tips on preventing infection during chemotherapy visit: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/chemotherapy-and-you/page4#C7
AB · Reviewed by JSK
posted: 7·2·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy / Chemo Side Effects"

Question:
What about not urinating much after chemo? I had chemo inside of my abdomen and next day I feel I can't urinate much. Why?

Answer:
It is very important that you contact one of your health care providers, such as your oncologist or your oncologist's nurse, about this as soon as possible to let them know immediately about this problem. Your difficulty with urination may may be due to a lack of fluid intake, or due due to other serious causes. Please take no chances on this and contact your doctor right away!
LK & AB
posted: 6·29·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy"

Question:
Could you please list some of the clinical presentations where febrile neutropenia may be overlooked or even missed, unless it is specifically being considered? Your help would be most appreciated.

Answer:
Febrile neutropenia is a condition marked by fever and decrease in the number of neutrophils in the blood. A neutrophil is a type of white blood cell that helps fight infection. Having too few neutrophils increases the risk of infection. Actually, it is unlikely that febrile neutropenia would be overlooked or missed. A CBC will pick up the neutropenia (and it is common to check this routinely with patients receiving chemotherapy). A fever should be reported to your healthcare provider. Different healthcare teams may have a different temperature level at which they want to be called immediately (usually 101F or 38.5C). Some drugs can be associated with fever (such as Interferon), which might initially mask the situation, but this is unlikely in someone who is receiving therapy that could affect the white cells. The most important thing is that if you have a fever and could even possibly be neutropenic that you contact your healthcare team right away.
LUK
posted: 4·25·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy"

Question:
It has been 19 days since my last chemo treatment. My legs are killing me! I feel like I have been on a stair stepper for days they are weak and I sometimes feel very shaky. Is this normal and how long does it last?

Answer:
Without knowing what chemotherapy you are on, it is difficult to provide information to specifically address your questions. A class of drugs called "taxanes" can cause this kind of side effect. If your chemo treatment included a taxane (such as Taxol or Taxotere), symptoms usually last about a week but some patients have them more intensely and longer.

Your situation presents a good example of the importance of continued communication with your health care team. Keeping a diary or journal of your side effects, including when and how strongly you feel them, can help you describe them to your provider and help you remember to discuss them and any other issues you are facing. Any time you have a side effect that lasts longer than previously or seems more severe, you should always let your healthcare team know right away. They may wish to see you in the office/clinic and/or can give you ideas about how to manage the symptom.

For tips to help you communicate with your heath care team see the section of our site called "Helpful Hints to Communicate Better at an Appointment" at Helpful Hints. JSK, AB and LUK
posted: 4·2·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy"

Question:
I finished my chemo in September, and my radiation at the end of November. I had a very difficult time with the chemo. I had lots of nausea in spite of all the medication I was given. The nausea has continued since the chemo. It is low grade. I have it when I awake, during the day, and even after eating. My doctor prescribed Prilosec. I still continue to have the nausea. Did the chemo damage my stomach?

Answer:
Nausea can be caused by many, things. It is important to follow up with your provider if you continue to experience it. You may need some additional tests to find the cause of your nausea which could include irritation, ulcer and or infection.

Your question raises a very important issue in health care: that of communication with your provider. Communication with a doctor or health care provider is meant to be an on-going process, especially if the difficulties you experience are not resolved through following the provider's first suggestion(s).

For instance, you experience a pain or a symptom that you report to a doctor. In your case, that is nausea. The doctor makes a recommendation. In your case, the doctor prescribes Prilosec.

There are two questions a person may want to remember to ask when a doctor or other health care provider makes a recommendation. The first question is, "How soon should I expect to feel better?" In your case, "About how long should it take for the nausea to go away once I start taking Prilosec?"

A follow up question could be, "What should I do if this solution doesn't help?"

People deserve to have the most complete resolution of illness and discomfort that is available. If one approach doesn't help, the problem should be discussed again with a provider and other options for help should be explored. JSK and AB
posted: 4·2·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy"

Question:
I have more then 6 of these side effects and in fact I never took chemotherapy. What is wrong with me? I'm only 18 and feel like (DELETED)! I really need help. What could be the reason for having these side effects?

Answer:
We are very concerned about you. You need to go to a doctor or clinic as soon as possible. If you have gone to a doctor before, but not gotten help - please go again. There are over 20 side effects that can result from chemotherapy listed on this page of the site. You tell us you have more than 6 of them, even though you have never been on chemo. No one on a web site will be able to tell you what is wrong. It sounds like you have no idea why you are feeling horrible. You need to be checked by a health care provider who can put together all the things that you tell them are bothering you, along with what they can see by examining you, and the information he/she may need to get from tests like blood and urine tests. If you can't afford to go to the doctor try calling 2-1-1 on the phone. Nearly every state uses the 2-1-1 phone line as an information service for where you can free or low cost help in your community. Or, go to a community or tribal health clinic. Or, check in the phone book business section to see if there is a "Planned Parenthood" office near you. They often will either see you at their clinic or refer you to a place that can help. Bring a written list of all the symptoms that are bothering you with you to the appointment-that way you won't forget to mention something when you get to the office. Try to be as specific as you can when describing your symptoms. For example, "It burns really bad every time I pee. No matter how much sleep, I am always tired and I have this dull headache that never goes away. I get chills at least 4 or 5 times a day and have a rash on my belly. I get these sharp stabbing pains in my lower back and all I want to do is cry all the time. Also, you might want to ask a trusted friend or family member to come with to help you remember what the doctor tells you. Take good care of yourself and please write back and let know how you are doing.
AB
posted: 2·4·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy"

Question:
We have a lot of literature on the subject. There is no awareness for patients with a g6pd blood can any one cast some light on the subject. 2/18/07

Answer:
Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency (g6pd)
When a person has a g6pd deficiency, their red blood cells are missing an important enzyme called G6PD. G6PD is part of the normal make up of red blood cells. In G6PD deficiency, if red blood cells come into contact with certain substances in the bloodstream, the missing G6PD enzyme causes the cells to rupture and die prematurely. This process can be triggered by the person who has G6PD deficiency taking sulfa or antimalaria medicines, eating fava beans, or having an infection. The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute has a web page that explains g6pd http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/ha/ha_whatis.html
Let us know if you have specific questions that may help a native cancer survivor with G6PD deficiency and we will try to find additional answers.
AB
posted: 2·4·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy"

Question:
My mother has recently undergone a breast removal surgery due to breast cancer...she is suffering from acute stomach aches...is it usual? How to prevent it...please help.

Answer:
The patient should call her surgeon if this is immediately after surgery. If it is not at the same time, then it is likely due to either medication or stress and she should call her primary caregiver.
JSK
posted: 2·4·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy"

Question:
I had 6 weeks of radiation for breast cancer after a lumpectomy and removal of 13 lymph nodes in 1999. I then had 3 treatments of high dose brachytherapy. I took tamoxifen every day for 5 years after the radiation treatments were finished. I've been suffering from fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and chronic pain syndrome since about 2000 and was finally diagnosed in 2002. I have most of the symptoms of these syndromes, and was reading the other day that radiation can cause a lot of the symptoms that my doctor and I have attributed to fibro and chronic fatigue. I was wondering if the radiation or the tamoxifen would cause these symptoms ONLY while I was undergoing them, or if I'd get the symptoms AFTER finishing the treatments. If you tell me that I'd get the side effects after finishing treatments, how long should I be experiencing the side effects and would you expect the side effects would eventually go away. Thanks.

Answer:
No mention of chemo, so I assume she had lumpectomy, followed by radiation and 5 years of tamoxifen. Fatigue associated with radiation is very short term. If it accompanies tamoxifen, it is usually associated with the hot flashes/sleep disturbance. It would normally resolve after tamoxifen is done. Chronic fatigue syndrome is still controversial, both in diagnosis and causation. There are no articles specifically tying it to radiation or tamoxifen that I am aware of.
JSK
posted: 2·4·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy"

Question:
What are the side effects of 5fu?

Answer:
This information can be found on our site at the following link: Chemo Drugs & SE. Scroll down the chart on the page and look for "Fluorouracil" which is the brand name of 5-FU.
AB
posted: 2·4·2007



Subject: "Chemotherapy"

Question:
What can I use for Vaginal Infection due to Chemo treatment?

Answer:
Please ask your nurse or doctor. There are several over-the-counter ointments you can use, but your provider may want you to use something stronger.
LB posted: 1·24·2007


Questions & AnswersTop of Page

Subject: "diabetes"

Question: My name is Laura and I'm a Diabetic T1. I was diagnosed in January and I have to put my hands up and admit I'm not taking it all that well. I rarely take my injections and I constantly feel low. I feel abnormal, I feel different. I've recently lost my boyfriend because he can't handle my 'depression'. I can't talk to anyone without them shouting at me because I'm not taking my injections and I can feel myself becoming more and more ill. I need help.

Response:
Laura, it sounds as though you are depressed. You need help right away. People who are diabetic are often depressed. It's hard to take good care of yourself when you're depressed.

You must see someone, a counselor, nurse, doctor, clergy person - anyone you trust, to get help. You can develop serious complications from not taking your medicines and end up really sick and in the hospital. It sounds like this could happen any day now.
DD
posted: 6·6·2012



Subject: "diabetes"

Question: How does diabetes affect blood flow?

Response:
Diabetes itself does not affect blood flow, but as the complications develop over time, it leads to hardening of the arteries, also called arteriosclerosis, which definitely decreases blood flow and causes heart attacks and strokes.
DD
posted: 6·6·2012



Subject: "diabetes"

Question: I have sugar fasting 167 and 244 after lunch - suggest?

Response:

    We hope you are sharing this information with your health care provider.
  • For most people with diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, we recommend that your fasting blood sugar usually be between 90 and 110.
  • Your sugars 1-2 hours after meals should not be higher than 180.
  • Sometimes, if you are an elder, for example, the recommended ranges are a little different.
  • You should talk with your health care provider about getting a "hemoglobin A1c" (people say "A one C"). This will tell you what your average blood sugar is over a 3 month time period. Keeping that average sugar in the recommended range will help prevent or delay diabetes complications. DL
posted: 1·18·2012



Subject: "diabetes"

Question: I have diabetes, bad eyes and circulation trouble what can I do?

Response:
We're sorry that you're having such serious problems with your diabetes. It is very important that you get to good medical care. It's urgent that you see an eye doctor to learn whether it's possible to prevent your eyes from getting any worse. And the same applies to your circulatory problems. A family doctor or nurse practitioner is the place to start. They can hear your concerns, examine you, and make some recommendations.

It sounds like it's urgent that you get medical care to prevent any more serious complications such as a stroke or heart attack.

If paying for care is the problem, please contact your nearest county health department. If you are an enrolled member of a federally-recognized tribe, look for the nearest indian health service or tribal clinic or, if you're near a city, the closest urban indian clinic. DL
posted: 10·19·2011



Subject: "diabetes / fbs"

Question: My fbs is 6.5    What is the number for diabetes?

Response:
This is not an fbs, since fbs usually stands for "fasting blood sugar." People with blood sugars less than 50 are usually seriously ill or even in a coma. There is another type of diabetes test called an "A1c," which is used to diagnose diabetes. Your test looks like it's an "A1c." You should ask whoever did the test for you what it means on their laboratory's scale. If it was your health care provider's office, you should call and ask to talk to the nurse or doctor. If you were tested at a health fair, you should call the sponsor of the health fair and tell them you need help understanding your test results.
DL
posted: 4·18·2011



Subject: "diabetes / eating habits"

Question: (Comment) Well said but difficult to control eating habits.

Response:
Making changes to eating habits can be a really big challenge. One thing that I have found helpfulis to spend a few minutes each morning reading and reviewing new nutrition information on credible web sites. A few minutes of reading new information and getting ideas can be motivating and remind you that many people have changed to healthy eating habits. Try not to think about what you are giving up but think of all the good, healthy foods you are able to eat. Reading a little on the web every morning helps remind you of this. I like the web because seeing all the pictures of healthy foods they have makes me want to eat them instead of the junk. It also really helps to stay on track with health eating if you work plenty of physical activity into your day. Check with your health care provider before starting to know how much and what kinds of activity are good for you. Visit the Help and Support Branch of our site at www.natamcancer.org//resources-nutrition.html for a whole list of credible websites and ideas to help with healthy eating and physical activity. Good luck and you CAN live well!
LUK
posted: 6·13·2008



Subject: "diabetes / Breast Cancer"

Question: (Comment) My friend's stitches keep opening. This is the fourth time. What can they do to help her?

Response:
There are many reasons for stitches to reopen. The most common causes are not allowing the area to heal by doing too much activity such as house cleaning, exercising or climbing stairs. It also depends on where the stitches are located and if the patient is overweight. Sometimes in areas of radiation or if the person is getting chemotherapy, it will be harder for the area to heal. The person needs to keep the area clean and dry and needs to try not to stretch or pull the area.
LUK
posted: 3·22·2008



Subject: "diabetes / Signs, Causes, Risks"

Question: (Comment) This is a very good read and very much appreciated, scary as it is. Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes after under going a mastectomy has really opened my eyes. I have a dreadful fear though. I have tried to quit smoking and find it's a nightmare...NOTHING works. What to do?

Response:
Thanks for your good words. Some fears are very healthy. Fear of the health effects of habitual smoking is a good, healthy fear. You have done one of the most important things that the millions of people who are now ex-smokers have done-reach out for some help. We are glad you wrote in and invite you to enter further comments to let us know how you are doing. Here are a few tips to help quit smoking. Most people who have quit smoking have made a lot of unsuccessful attempts before they were able to quit. So, even if you have tried before and failed- you are not alone. Your failures can give you lots of information about things that worked for you and things that didn't work for you in the past. Think about and make a list of things that you think helped you in your efforts to quit in the past and things that didn't. That leads to the next tip. Instead of trying to quit tomorrow, it may be better to set a date to quit in a week or two. Make it a formal quit date. Then do everything you can to prepare for your quit date and get ready to take that healthy leap! If you are able go to the clinic and/or your health care provider and tell them of your wish to quit and ask for help. If you have a car that you smoke in, start by cleaning it out really well, ash trays and all and make your car a no-smoking zone. If you can, do the same with your home-only smoke outside the house. Do everything you can to "change up" your normal routines and make smoking feel "out of balance" to you. Tell everyone you know about your quit date. Ask for support and prayers. Ask your friends and family to call and see how you're doing, especially the first few days. Go out side and walk. Drink plenty of water. Practice deep breathing. Do you want smoking cessation help right in your own home for free? Call 800-QUIT-NOW or (1-800-784-8669) This is the number to reach your own state quit line from anywhere in the country. Trained, supportive smoking cessation specialists, many of them ex-smokers themselves, will give you a million practical tips, tons of support and encouragement and some states are able to provide free nicotine patches. If anyone else in your home or circle of friends wants to quit, you may want to them about quitting together and supporting each other. Best of luck and let us know how you're doing.
AB
posted: 3·6·2008



Subject: "diabetes / Signs, Causes, Risks"

Question: Is it possible for a patient to have both the type 1 and type 2 diabetes simultaneously?

Response:
Now this is an interesting question. Type 1 diabetes is the total absence of insulin made by the pancreas, and so it's necessary to take insulin every day of your life. Type 2 diabetes is a state of "insulin resistance" which keeps you from being able to use your very own insulin which your body makes. Although we've never heard of it, theoretically it should be possible for someone with type 1 diabetes to gain so much weight and/or become so inactive or because of medication they have to take for some other medical condition that they become resistant to the insulin they have to take everyday. This might then result in a situation where the type 1 diabetic would have to take type 2 medicines to help them use their prescribed insulin. We'll keep thinking about this!
DDD
posted: 9·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / Signs, Causes, Risks"

Question: What age or group of people are most affected by diabetes?

Response:
Type 2 diabetes used to be called "adult-onset diabetes." It still mostly affects adults. However, in the past 10+ years, with the increasing overweight among children and teens, we are seeing increasing number of young people, as young as 5 years old, developing type 2 diabetes.
DDD
posted: 9·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / Articles / Weight Predicts Diabetes"

Question: Please do let me know how a person looses weight in diabetes and what food supplements should he take to gain weight.

Response:
We can't make any recommendations for losing or gaining weight without knowing more about a person's medical situation. In general the best way to lose weight for a diabetic is to get an exercise prescription from their health care provider. A daily walk of 30-60 minutes helps lower the blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol, while it burns calories to help lose weight. But people with diabetes have a risk of having heart problems, so you must check with your health care provider before starting exercise.
DDD
posted: 9·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / Articles / Cinnamon"

Question: Nice information shared. Could cinnamon tea be used to reduce fat (as it lowers sugar/ LDL cholesterol) in the body as well for over a longer period of time or for the rest of your life? Any side effects?

Response:
Cinnamon is not yet documented to lower blood fats or blood sugar, even though many companies which are currently trying to sell it may say otherwise. A small amount of cinnamon tea everyday should be no problem. But some people are severely allergic to cinnamon, so the possibility exists of becoming allergic. It is important not to take large amounts of cinnamon, whether as tea or, especially, as the oil. You should not drink the oil or suck too much on toothpicks, etc., that are soaked in cinnamon oil. Cinnamon is a stimulant. It can cause rapid heart rate and dizziness. So enjoy an occasional cup of cinnamon tea, but don't overdo it and don't expect it to lower sugar or cholesterol.
DDD
posted: 9·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / Breast Cancer / Short-term illness"

Question: My dad is a diabetic. He takes insulin. He woke up the other night in a cold sweat. He went to the kitchen to get some food and passed out. He was unable to get up for a while and crawled to couch to get up. He laid down there for awhile and then the next morning he was ok. His blood sugar that morning was 129.. Do you think it was his sugar dropping or what? He had a glass of orange juice and 2 sugar pills earlier that night before bed.

Response:
We do not have enough information to explain what your father's problem is, plus we cannot do diagnosis over the internet. But we agree with you that your father has a serious problem and needs to see his health care provider as soon as possible! It is very possible that you are correct, that he was having an episode of very low blood sugar. But he needs to be evaluated for other problems, too, such as heart problems. We hope you can go to the doctor with him. It's important when you go that you take all his medicines, so they can see everything he's taking. It's also very important that you take his blood sugar results. Sometimes there's a chart and sometimes they are saved in the glucose meter. He may need a medicine adjustment. Or does he have some new medical problem that's keeping him from eating, so his blood sugar is not as high as usual? We hope you can help him feel better soon.
DDD
posted: 9·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / Complications"

Question: What organ does diabetes effect?

Response:
Diabetes affects many organs and other parts of the body. For an overview of all the ways diabetes can affect the body please see www.natamcancer.org/page183.html
AB/DD
posted: 8·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / Management"

Question: Would be right to drink alcohol and gutka in diabetes?

Response:
Gutka appears not to be a pure herb or plant, but a commercial product that is being sold to people to make money for the manufacturers. One of the worrisome things about gutka is that it contains tobacco. Tobacco contains nicotine. Nicotine causes the blood vessels everywhere in the body to get narrow (constrict), decreasing the amount of blood, oxygen and nutrients to get to the tissues. For this reason gutka cannot be recommended to anyone - especially diabetics who already have problems with their blood vessels. The problem of hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) in people with diabetes is one of the main reasons for the high rates of stroke, heart attack, sores that won't heal and the neuropathy (loss of feeling in some areas, pain in other areas). This is also why so many diabetics lose their limbs by amputation. BUT now that we know that diabetes can often be prevented and that these complications can often be prevented in those who already have diabetes, we try to help people learn to keep healthy through nutritious foods and exercise. Alcohol can be used in moderation by some people with diabetes. However, alcohol is processed by the body very similarly to pure sugar. So alcohol should not be used by someone who is having difficulty keeping their sugar in the normal ranges.
DD
posted: 8·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / Treatment"

Question: What is a high blood sugar count?

Response:
Normal fasting blood glucose level is below 100 mg/dl. So a high blood sugar count would be any result 100 or higher. Pre diabetes=100-125 mg/dl, Diabetes=126 mg/dl or higher on two tests. For more information please see www.natamcancer.org/02_QOL_Diab_Defined_11-05-04.html
AB
posted: 8·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / Signs, Causes and Risks"

Question:
Can you be born with diabetes and if so is their ever going to be a cure for diabetes?

Response:
It is extremely rare for an infant to be born with diabetes or to develop it within the first month of life. When this does occur, it is not related to the more usual type I and type II diabetes that our website refers to. This type of infant diabetes appears to be a very unusual genetic problem.
It is very possible that within our lifetimes there will be a cure for both type I and type II diabetes. Pancreas tissue transplants (to provide internal insulin) are being studied as a possible cure for type I diabetes. Type II diabetes, the type which affects more than 99% of Native American diabetics, is more complicated than just not having your own insulin. But this, too, is being studied vigorously. It will probably be just a few years before there is a way to help type II diabetics use their body's own insulin more effectively.
In the meantime we know there are three things each of us can do to try to prevent developing type II diabetes:

  • maintain a healthy weight for our height and age
  • eat a balanced, normal-calorie diet for our weight
  • be physically active (preferably at least 30 minutes 4-5 times a week)
For those who already have diabetes just walking 30 minutes a day helps lower the blood sugar, blood cholesterol and blood pressure. Be sure to check with your health care provider before starting an exercise program. posted: 8·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / Signs, Causes and Risks"

Question: What are the consequences of diabetes?

Response:
Please see www.natamcancer.org/page183.html for the "complications" or consequences of uncontrolled diabetes.
AB/DD
posted: 8·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / Signs, Causes and Risks"

Question: How is diabetes best treated or managed?

Response:
Please see our information on diagnosis and management at www.natamcancer.org//page180.html and our information on the treatment of diabetes at www.natamcancer.org//page181.html
AB
posted: 8·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / Signs, Causes and Risks"

Question: Are there any treatments for diabetes?

Response: Yes, there are treatments for diabetes. Please see www.natamcancer.org/page181.html AB/DD
posted: 8·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / complications"

Question:
I was told that I had lucavasculatis, the tiny blood vessels wasn't getting enough blood. I was told that my tiny blood vessels were not getting blood. I get sores on my feet and bottoms of legs. It takes forever to heal. Please respond to my comment.

Response:
Vasculitis is a problem that can keep your body from getting enough blood and oxygen, depending on where the vasculitis is in your body.

We would recommend that you ask your doctor to write down what your problem is or that you take a family member with you when you visit the doctor. The doctor should also tell you what you can do to try to stay healthy in spite of the vasculitis. Vasculitis is not related to diabetes, so we can't help you with the vasculitis alone. But if you have vasculitis AND diabetes, be sure to read the next part of our response:

We are sorry to hear that you are having such problems with your blood vessels and those sores on your feet. This is unfortunately a pretty common problem, if you have had diabetes for awhile and especially if your blood sugar has been staying high. It is very important that you try to prevent more sores and to try to keep those blood vessels as open as possible. To do that you should:

  • follow your doctor's instructions for caring for your feet
  • follow your doctor's recommendations for taking your medicines
  • try to keep your blood sugar and your cholesterol in the ranges that your doctor has recommended for you.
AND, if you're a smoker, please stop smoking! Smoking causes the blood vessels to get smaller also, but that will get better if you quit smoking. Ask a family member to go to the doctor with you to ask questions and take notes, so when you get home, you have a good record of what the doctor wants you to do to try to stay well. DD
posted: 7·23·2007



Subject: "diabetes"

Question:
I'm not a diabetic. My husband is. I was testing my sugar and it was 19. The meter told me to call the doctor. I waited an hour and tested again and it was 21. But I feel good. Should this concern me?

Response:
A human being with a blood sugar of 19 or 21 would not be conscious. Thank goodness you are conscious! The question is, "why did the machine read 19 and 21?" There could be several reasons: the most likely is that you didn't have enough blood for the machine to read or the machine is not working (does it seem to work properly when your husband uses it?) or the strips are out of date. We would recommend that you have your health care provider check your fasting blood sugar in their lab. It also sounds like you or your husband should take your glucose meter and strips to your clinic and have them checked out to make sure they are working okay. It's good you want to know what your blood sugar is. We hope you get a good result.
DD
posted: 7·16·2007



Subject: "diabetes / breast cancer"

Question:
Should you go for a check up in a clinic if you feel lumps on your breasts or leave it and wait for further development?

Response:
Most women have some type of lumpiness in their breasts. Lumps can appear at any time and come in various types and sizes. Most lumps are not cancer, but your health care provider should always check the lump(s) carefully. Check with your health care provider if you notice any kind of lump. (Source: "Understanding Breast Changes" National Cancer Institute) For resources to help with the cost of finding and treating breast cancer (if diagnosed), visit our section on Resources and scroll down to the section titled, "Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Treatment Act."
AB
posted: 7·16·2007



Subject: "diabetes / complications"

Question:
What happens to a 19 year old male if he won't stop smoking, even though he has type 1 juvenile diabetes?

Response:
Smoking and diabetes, whether Type 1 or 2, are a dangerous combination. Both types cause blood vessel damage in the heart as well as the arteries of the limbs, kidneys, brain and eyes, which can lead to serious problems even at young ages. Adolescents and young adults who develop diabetes often have emotional issues related to their diabetes. They may deny their illness, wanting to be like the other kinds who don't have to worry about their blood sugar, etc. They may also look for ways to take control of some aspect of their lives, since the diabetes part may seem out of their control. The choice to smoke may be an example of a young man needing to feel in control of at least one aspect of his life. You may need to have his health care provider help educate him and help him feel in charge and able to make healthier choices.
DD
posted: 6·29·2007



Subject: "diabetes / complications"

Question:
This is a deaf lady that wants to know how to do this. I wonder how I can remove my very poor circulation? Houstonian

Response:
Poor circulation can mean that you just get cold easily or it can mean that you have hardening of the arteries, which can cause heart attacks and other serious problems. Without knowing more of your medical history I can only recommend that you see your health care provider and discuss this to make sure you are doing everything you can to be healthy.
DD
posted: 6·29·2007



Subject: "diabetes / diagnosis and management"

Question:
I had a 5.4 on my A1C test. Does that mean I am pre-diabetic? I've had two IFG tests one was 113 and the other was 89.

Response:
The usual range for the diagnosis of pre-diabetes is a fasting blood sugar of 100-125 on at least two occasions. Hemoglobin 'A1C' as it's often called isn't used to diagnose either pre-diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes. In general an A1C of 6% or less is considered normal.
DD
posted: 6·29·2007



Subject: "diabetes / pre-diabetes"

Question:
My BSF is 129 and BSR is 147. Is that pre-diabetes?

Response:
It requires at least two fasting blood measurements to diagnose Type 2 diabetes. In addition to having a fasting blood sugar between 100 and 125, another way to be diagnosed is to have a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test.
DD
posted: 6·29·2007



Subject: "diabetes"

Question:
How can I get diabetes even if my family has never gotten it before?

Response:
Whether a person develops Type 2 diabetes depends on many factors. The most important factors are: increasing age, increasing weight, high-calorie diet, little or no physical activity, family history of diabetes. In addition, Type 2 diabetes is diagnosed more often now. However, because it can be 'silent' or without symptoms for years, it may be that one or more of your family members had Type 2 diabetes that was never diagnosed. If you have brothers and sisters or children, help them learn good eating and exercise habits (be a good role model) to try to prevent them from developing Type 2 Diabetes too.
DD
posted: 6·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / signs, causes, risks"

Question:
I went to my doctor last October and had a glucose reading of 98. I fell in November and now have a reading of 400 and above. I have a severe level of stress due to the accident. In turn my sugar level caused my cholesterol to elevate. My triglyceride level is off the charts at 1400. Can this kind of trauma and stress be a trigger?

Response:
There are many reasons your blood sugar and your blood fats (or lipids-cholesterol and triglycerides) are up now. Stress can increase your blood sugar, but not usually your blood fats. If your activity level has decreased, that will increase both your blood sugar and blood fats. A third reason may be a change in your diet since your accident, especially if you're a "stress eater." Yet another reason may be a change in medication. Talk with your health care provider about all these possibilities and see how you can work together to get you back to good health.
DD
posted: 6·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes / signs, causes, risks"

Question:
How does physical illness cause diabetes?

Response:
Physical illness, like emotional stress, causes hormone reactions in our bodies. Some of these hormones have side effects. They can increase your blood sugar and your blood pressure, just to name two examples. If a person is prone to develop Type 2 Diabetes, getting sick or having something very stressful happen, may tip them over the diabetes edge, so to speak.
DD
posted: 6·27·2007



Subject: "diabetes"

Question:
MY BLOOD SUGAR HAS BEEN OVER 600 FOR 5 HOURS NOW

Response:
A blood sugar of 600 is dangerous. You must get to your health care provider today. Anytime your blood sugar is higher than 300 and doesn't come down in a matter of hours, you need to see your health care provider. Please be aware that this site and it's section for comments is not intended for or able to give direct medical advise. This is an education and awareness site and should not used for direct medical advise such as in this situation.
AB and DD
posted: 5·31·2007



Subject: "diabetes"

Question:
How can you prevent Diabetes?

Answer:
Good news! By losing only 5 to 10 percent of body weight, by getting 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week and eating healthier, people with pre-diabetes can delay or prevent the onset of the disease. The "Small Steps, Big Rewards: Prevent type 2 Diabetes" campaign, spreads the message of diabetes prevention. The National Diabetes Education Program, created materials and messages for specifically designed for Native Americans and other high risk groups. Click on the link below to learn more and to view the materials.
AB
ndep.nih.gov/campaigns/SmallSteps/SmallSteps_powertoprevent.htm
posted: 4·25·2007



Subject: "diabetes"

Question:
How much sugar intake in milligrams should a person take to stay healthy, on a daily basis?

Answer:
When you say 'sugar,' we aren't sure if you mean table sugar or carbohydrates, the food group which includes table sugar, but also many other important and much healthier foods. If you mean table sugar, the answer for people with diabetes is little to none. Table sugar is rapidly turned into blood sugar and raises your blood sugar quickly. Other kinds of carbohydrates, however, are very important and healthy foods: whole grain breads and whole grain cereals (by whole grain we mean, for example, whole wheat, oats and oatmeal, bran, cornmeal) and pasta are the most common.

These foods are digested much more slowly than pure sugar and so when eaten in normal portions they do not cause the rapid and high rises in your blood sugar. And you get many other vitamins, minerals and fiber from these foods - and none of these benefits is in pure sugar. You should ask your health care provider to prescribe a diet and exercise program (even chair exercises, if you're disabled) based on your age, current weight and blood sugar readings. This could include the number of grams of carbohydrates (or 'carbs') you should eat each day. DD
posted: 4·2·2007



Subject: "diabetes"

Question:
Why does diabetes lead to poor healing and what types of injuries do they mean? General things like bruises or sprains and things like that?

Answer:
The major reason that diabetes leads to poor healing is that diabetes damages the blood vessels. This keeps oxygen and infection-fighting cells and the good nutrition needed to heal from easily reaching the injured or damaged area. The types of injuries that are most worrisome are those which cause a break in the skin. The deeper the wound, the more difficult it is to heal. And it may take weeks or months in persons with diabetes. The other problem with these wounds is that with diabetes it's more difficult to fight off infections in general. So the risk of getting a bad infection in one of these wounds is high. Finally, another effect of diabetes is loss of feeling, especially in the feet and lower legs. This can allow a simple problem, like a crack between the toes from athlete's foot, to get sore and infected without the individual even knowing they have a problem - if they don't check their feet everyday.
DD
posted: 4·2·2007



Subject: "diabetes"

Question:
What does it mean if "mean glucose" result is 165, done at 90 days but other home testing is almost always under 120?

Answer:
This is a question you should check with your health care provider - with your glucose meter available at your appointment. This difference most likely means that you aren't testing your blood sugars at the most helpful times. If you mean that your fasting blood sugar is almost always under 120, then it's quite likely that your blood sugar 1-2 hours after meals is going up to 180 or higher. That would make your 3-month average a lot higher than 120. Also, checking the blood sugar once or even 4 times a day is just doing spot checks. But when you have the 90-day test done, it is a way of checking the average of 24 hours a day for 3 months. But, to be sure, take your glucose meter in to your health care provider to make sure it's accurate.
DD
posted: 4·2·2007



Subject: "diabetes"

Question:
What does a level of 133 mean?

Answer:
If you mean a fasting blood sugar (or glucose) level of 133, that is a higher than normal reading. The definition of diabetes is a fasting blood sugar of 126 or higher on at least two occasions. If it is repeated on a different day and the next result is also 126 or higher, then the diagnosis of diabetes can be made. Sometimes an additional test called an oral glucose tolerance test is also done to confirm the diagnosis.
DD
posted: 4·2·2007



Subject: "diabetes"

Question:
Twice now I was told that my fasting blood sugar was slightly elevated. The doctor said it was 108. My va1c test was 5.3. Why does my doctor want me on a 1500 calorie diet when I don't even have diabetes or am not overweight?

Answer:
Without knowing any more about your medical situation we are unable to give you specific advice. A fasting blood sugar between 100 and 125 mg% can indicate a condition called "pre-diabetes." This result needs to be double-checked or confirmed by another test called a glucose tolerance test. Because pre-diabetes carries a very high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, when pre-diabetes is confirmed, it is treated with a restricted calorie diet and exercise - and sometimes medication. All of these are to try to prevent the development of diabetes. It may be that this is what your doctor had in mind. It sounds like it's very important for you to have another discussion with your doctor about what your situation is and why she or he made these recommendations. You should also ask what the treatment goals are and when you should check back for re-testing.
DD
posted: 2·4·2007



Subject: "diabetes"

Question:
Twice now I was told that my fasting blood sugar was slightly elevated. The doctor said it was 108. My va1c test was 5.3. Why does my doctor want me on a 1500 calorie diet when I don't even have diabetes or am not overweight?

Answer:
Without knowing any more about your medical situation we are unable to give you specific advice. A fasting blood sugar between 100 and 125 mg% can indicate a condition called "pre-diabetes." This result needs to be double-checked or confirmed by another test called a glucose tolerance test. Because pre-diabetes carries a very high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, when pre-diabetes is confirmed, it is treated with a restricted calorie diet and exercise - and sometimes medication. All of these are to try to prevent the development of diabetes. It may be that this is what your doctor had in mind. It sounds like it's very important for you to have another discussion with your doctor about what your situation is and why she or he made these recommendations. You should also ask what the treatment goals are and when you should check back for re-testing.
DD
posted: 2·4·2007



Subject: "diabetes"

Question:
I am hormone positive with the breast cancer. I want to know since insulin is a hormone also, can it be a threat in my cancer growing within insulin? I have diabetes and wonder after taking tamoxifen five years if I have to also take insulin? Can it advance a new cancer growth?

Answer:
This is a very good question. We are happy to report that insulin is not the same kind of hormone that your breast cancer is sensitive to. You do not need to worry about taking insulin or having insulin interact with your cancer or your cancer medicines. However, it is important for you to take good care of your overall health in order to help prevent the cancer from coming back. This means you should work to keep your blood sugars in the ranges your health care providers recommend for you. Keeping your blood sugars in or near the normal range can prevent infections and other complications of diabetes. Ask your health care provider to see a dietitian or nutritionist to learn how to choose the healthiest foods. And, be sure to ask for an exercise prescription that meets the needs of your age, ability and medical condition.
DD
posted: 2·4·2007



Subject: "diabetes"

Question:
I would like a list of all red meats? Does red meat include more than beef?

Answer:
Generally, in the United States the term 'red meat' refers to meat from beef, pork and lamb. When health care professionals talk about red meat, these three are what are usually meant.
DD
posted: 2·4·2007



Subject: "diabetes"

Question:
Is there a cure for diabetes?

Answer:
There is currently no cure for diabetes. That is a good reason for people who are at high risk for diabetes to do everything they can to reduce their risk for developing the disease. The three most important things that a person can do to reduce their risk of developing diabetes is to increase physical activity, eat nutritiously and if overweight, losing even 5-7 % of your body weight can reduce your risk. Diabetes is serious, but people with diabetes can live long, healthy, happy lives by taking good care of themselves and doing the work needed to manage their disease. Here is a story of a vision of hope by George Perez of the Nambe Pueblo in New Mexico: www.laplaza.org/health/dwc/nadp/eaglestory.html
AB
posted: 2·4·2007



Subject: "Diabetes"

Question:
Where can I find out about the diabetes food exchange book?

Answer:
http://www.diabetes.org/nutrition-and-recipes/nutrition/exchangelist.jsp
posted: 1·24·2007


Questions & AnswersTop of Page

Subject: "Side effects / Fatique"

Question:
I had stage 3 cancer (carcinoid tumor) and it was removed with part of my small intestines on 8 Feb. I have not had chemo or radiation. Is it possible I could still experience extreme fatigue? please let me know and thank you in advance cajunqt96@aol.com+-

Answer:
Fatigue can be caused by many factors that may or may not be related to your cancer diagnosis and the surgery you had in February. It is important that you talk to your health care provider about your fatigue as soon as possible and be sure the doctor you see is told about the surgery you had in February. It is possible that your fatigue is even getting worse over time rather than better. The job of the small intestine is to absorb most of the nutrients from what we eat and drink. Depending on how much and what section of your small intestine was removed your body may not be absorbing enough nutrients or vitamins which could be causing you to feel extremely fatigued. But this is only one of many possible causes for your fatigue. The important thing is for you to go get checked as soon as possible.
AB
posted: 9·20·2011



Subject: "Side effects / Hair loss"

Question:
What can I do to help my husband overcome fatigue after having chemotherapy and radiation?

Answer:
This is addressed under
"Side Effects- Fatigue" LB
posted: 1·24·2007


Questions & AnswersTop of Page

Subject: "Side effects / Hair loss"

Question:
Can someone give me the name of some Chemo for Breast Cancer that you will not make you lose your hair when taking the chemo. This is my 4th time for breast cancer. I lost my hair the 1st time but not the next two times. The 1st time it was adrimyicin and taxatere and I lost my hair. The other 2 times I was on Navelbine and Herceprin off and on since 2003. My Dr. now wants to put me on Abraxane 1 time every 3 weeks. My Dr. tells me I will lose my hair. I understand hair will grow back and is usually even healthier. I am going through this for the 4th time and the hair thing is really getting to me. The first time it didn't bother me. I dont understand why it is now but it is really bothering me. Please let me know if you know of any other chemo I could take that would not make me lose my hair but would kill the cancer.

Answer:
Xeloda (capecitabine) is an effective breast cancer drug that is not associated with hair loss. In a palliative intent, this may be appropriate for this patient if she has no other contraindications. Capecitabine can be combined with the new drug Lapatinib (Tykerb) is specifically for patients who have her-2-neu overexpression.
Both drugs are oral (by mouth) instead of intravenous chemo.
JSK
posted: 11·11·2008



Subject: "Side effects / Hair loss"

Question:
Evista may not cause hair loss but if a person stops taking Evista, could that cause hair loss?

Answer:
Stopping Evista should not contribute to hair loss.
JSK
posted: 12·10·2007



Subject: "Side effects / Hair loss"

Question:
Due to chemo for breast cancer, my hair thinned out to a point that I look like a baby chick. It's now been 6 weeks since my last chemo but I'm noticing that it's still falling out and getting thinner. I'm at the end of my 3rd week of radiation to my breast but was told that radiation has no effect on my hair growth. Does anyone have any ideas as to why my hair is still falling out little by little? I'm so frightened that my hair will not grow back.

Answer:
You are correct that radiation to the breast would not result in hair loss on your head. Hair usually begins to fall out 10 to 14 days after you first begin chemo and can continue for several weeks after your last chemo treatment. It takes about four to six weeks for your hair to recover from chemotherapy. Then you can expect about a quarter inch of new growth each month and to regrow a full head of hair in six months to a year after you stop treatment. Your hair may temporarily be a different shade or texture. For more information on hair loss from chemotherapy please visit the "Medicine Wheel: The Body", page of this website found at hairloss-body. Be sure to scroll all the way down on the page to tips on how to protect your hair as it grows back. AB
AB
posted: 7·28·2007



Subject: "Side effects / Hair loss"

Question:
Hi, Where can you purchase these products: caps that hold ice cubes against your scalp, gel-filled caps that are placed in a special freezer in between use electrically cooled cap that mean you have to remain sitting in the chair while this is plugged into the wall, cold air pocket caps? (These products are used by some to try to prevent hair loss during chemotherapy.)

Answer:
In order to find this information for you, I went to a very helpful site called PubMed. PubMed is a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine that includes over 16 million citations from MEDLINE and other life science journals for biomedical articles back to the 1950s. PubMed includes links to full text articles and other related resources and is found at: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi

I tried entering several different combinations of search terms in order to find articles about the cooling caps for the prevention of hair loss during chemotherapy. The combination of search terms I used that retrieved 8 articles on the caps you described was "cold cap chemotherapy hair loss". In scanning through the articles, I discovered that the effectiveness of the caps vary greatly related to two variables, the type of chemotherapy given and the patient's liver function. The articles identified the brand names of the caps tested. If, after reading through the articles, and discussing the option with your doctor, you still wish to explore purchasing a cap, we recommend you do a goggle search for the brand names of the specific caps in which you are interested, to find contact information for each company that produces the caps. I looked up three brand name caps named in the articles. Although the sites thoroughly described and promoted the product and gave contact information for those interested in purchasing a cap, none of the websites listed the prices of their product on the web site. (a red flag for me personally) One site discussed "financing" options which led me to believe the costs of may be quite high. AB
posted: 4·25·2007



Subject: "Side effects / Hair loss"

Question:
I am taking a lot of drugs for cancer and I am suffering from hair loss, it is nothing to do with chemotherapy because I haven't had any. Could it be something to do with any drugs that I am taking?

Answer:
A number of drugs have been known to contribute to hair loss - and as with all things, each person reacts differently to different medication. The patient should ask the doctor or pharmacist---because they know what types of medications are being used by the patient.
posted: 1·24·2007



Subject: "Side effects / Hair loss"

Question:
My hair is just starting to grow back after chemo treatments. What is the reason for it coming back curly?

Answer:
Good question and one that a lot of people ask - actually a few also ask why it comes in a different color. For some people it is curly for several months after completing chemo, and then returns to its previous texture. But for others it remains curly. It has something to do with how the combination of chemo drugs (or sometimes a single chemo medication) may affect the hair root.
LB
posted: 1·24·2007


Questions & AnswersTop of Page

Subject: "Lymphedema"

Question:
In 2008, I had lumpectomy surgery on my right arm to removed about 14 lymph nodes. Everything was going well until in the mid of 2011, my right arm started to swell and painful. I was given a course of antibiotic and the pain eased off but the swell remain at times its growing bigger. It feels like numbness and uncomfortable, it grows about one and a half bigger than my left arm. currently I was advised to use an arm sleeve to control it. Am worried. I live my life normal with daily activities.

Answer: Your oncologist should examine you to make sure it is basic lymphedema, not new swollen glands. You should see, also, a physical therapist who specializes in lymphedema and you may need to have intensive wrapping for awhile before going back to your sleeve. JSK
posted: 6·6·2012



Subject: "Lymphedema"

Question:
I would like to know the do's and don'ts of traveling in a car, I have lymphedema in my legs and feet. We are planning a trip to Las Vegas and we live in Wisconsin I am concerned about the elevation in the mountains we will be traveling through and then we are going to New York City These will be in the span of 2 weeks. I dont fly anymore cause everything I read I feel it is risky. I got lymphedema after an infection on my calf of my leg back in 1998. What precautions should I take? Should I only drive so many hours, etc. I would appreciate any information, thank you, AH

Answer: You should wear your fitted lymphedema stockings and get out every hour to stretch and elevate your legs. If you can put the seat back low and put the legs up part of the time, that would help too. JSK
posted: 6·6·2012



Subject: "Lymphedema"

Question:
If I have lymphedema should I go to tanning bed?

Answer: No one should go to a tanning bed, particularly a cancer survivor. LB
posted: 6·6·2012



Subject: "Lymphedema"

Question:
Is there a risk in having a knee replacement performed on a leg that is opposite the one that has lymphedema in that the lymphedema may spread in the effected leg and/or the one having the surgery?

Answer: No lymph nodes are removed with knee replacement and therefore there should be no risk of lymphedema. Swelling occurs but is localized to the knee complex. JSK
posted: 1·13·2012



Subject: "Side effects / Lymphedema"

Question:
I had a left breast mastectomy and 12 lymph nodes removed 6 years ago. I did not have radiation or chemotherapy. I did an intensive scar tissue massage program to prevent any scar tissue in the chest area and under my arms. I have never had lymphedema. I wear a compression garment when I fly or drive long distances, or am doing heavy work in the garden.

I had done sweat lodges about 20 years ago. I have been presented with opportunities to do them now.

I am aware that extreme heat from hot tubs and saunas pose a risk for lymphedema.

What is the medical and spiritual perspective on doing sweat lodges when one has had lymph nodes removed?

Answer: You recognize that there is some risk of lymphedema but also some important spiritual benefit. I would suggest you use your lymphedema sleeve a few hours before, measure upper arm circumference and use the sleeve overnight after and measure the next morning. If any increase then you know to discontinue sweats. JSK

For more information on lymphedema see
www.natamcancer.org/lymphedema-body.html.
posted: 3·13·2010



Subject: "Side effects / Lymphedema"

Question:
Is there a risk in having a knee replacement performed on a leg that is opposite the one that has lymphedema in that the lymphedema may spread in the effected leg and/or the one having the surgery?

Answer: No lymph nodes are removed with knee replacement and therefore there should be no risk of lymphedema. Swelling occurs but is localized to the knee complex. JSK

For more information on lymphedema see
www.natamcancer.org/lymphedema-body.html.
posted: 3·13·2010



Subject: "Side effects / Lymphedema"

Question:
Can I give blood or plasma if I have lymphedema?

Answer: You should not give blood from an arm affected by lymphedema. You should not give blood from an arm in which you are at risk for lymphedema because you have had lymph nodes removed in your arm pit. You may give blood from your other arm if you meet the other qualifications for giving blood. Be sure to tell the person talking the blood that you have been diagnosed with cancer before donating blood. According to the American Cancer Society, people who were treated for cancer with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, or immunotherapy cannot donate blood. Nor can anyone who has had leukemia or lymphoma.

For more information on the question, "Can I donate blood if I have had cancer?" see the following link: www.cancer.org/docroot/ETO/content/ETO_1_4x_Donation_by_Cancer_Survivors.asp

*A note on blood donation - When blood is donated, a portion of the blood may be kept and stored for research purposes. The American Red Cross web site states, "A sample of your blood or a portion of your donation might be used now or in the future for additional tests or other medical studies. Please tell us if you object." www.redcross.org/services/biomed/0,1082,0_553_,00.html

If this practice is against your tribal or personal beliefs be sure to inform the staff at the donation site that you do not give permission for your blood stored to be used in research.

For more information on lymphedema see www.natamcancer.org/lymphedema-body.html. AB/LUK
posted: 6·16·2008



Subject: "Side effects / Lymphedema"

Question:
Can high blood pressure cause lymphedema a few years after a mastectomy?

Answer: High blood pressure does not cause lymphedema. Lymphedema can occur years after treatment and we really don't know why. JSK
posted: 12·10·2007



Subject: "Side effects / Lymphedema"

Question:
I am a male having groin lymph nodes removed:

  1. How will this affect me in the future?
  2. Will I be more susceptible to infectionss or disease?
  3. What long term considerations are there?

Answer:
  1. Removal of groin nodes can be essential to planning any cancer therapy and understanding prognosis. It is a common cancer staging procedure.

  2. Most healthy individuals have no major problems after this type of surgery. The development of lymphedema depends partly on how many lymph nodes need to be removed at the surgery.

  3. Prevention of infection of the wound is important and the surgeon will discuss and usually write instructions for wound care. Infection of the leg on the side of the groin node removal can occur with any open skin injury to that leg even years later. Therefore patients are always instructed to quickly treat any cut, insect bite, etc and to report any redness or streaking on the leg.

  4. If lymphedema should develop, there are treatments available at physical therapy departments.
  5. JSK
    posted: 1·24·2007


Subject: "Side effects / Lymphedema"

Question:
I have recently developed high blood pressure and have started medication for it. I have lymphedema in my left arm and have worn a compression sleeve for 9 years. I do manual massage every morning on the arm.

How does the lymphedema affect high blood pressure and how does high blood pressure affect lymphedema? My lymphedema has gotten worse since I take my blood pressure every morning. Help?

Answer:
I know of no association between high blood pressure and lymphedema. Clinically, I have not seen much improvement or worsening in women who have both. While diuretics are often a mainstay of hypertension control, they usually don't work on lymphedema -- but should also not worsen it.
JSK
posted: 1·24·2007


Questions & AnswersTop of Page

Subject: "Treatment / Radiation"

Question:
I had radiation therapy for rectal cancer 4 years ago periodically the burn reappears is this normal?

Answer:
Unfortunately, radiation induced rectal complications can occur years later in about 5 to 10% of patients. These include bleeding, ulcers and strictures. Treatment consists of medical therapy such as anusol steroid suppositories, Laser treatment and even a colostomy. Most heal with conservative measures.
DP
posted: 1·14·2012



Subject: "Treatment / Radiation"

Question:
Does radiation to the pelvis following hysterectomy touch the bone?

Answer:
The radiation is focused to the area of your tumor and a bit beyond it, but they can be radiation "scatter" that will reach your bones. The beam is very focused, but because you have bone all around the area, some radiation will touch the bones.
LUK
posted: 3·22·2008



Subject: "Treatment / Radiation"

Question:
I have just finished a 30 day course of radiation treatment for larynx cancer. In the last few days I have been running a temperature. Is this common? I am taking leviquin.

Answer:
Whenever someone who has recently received chemotherapy or radiation therapy has an unexplained temperature, particularly 101F or above, he/she should notify his/her provider right away. A new temperature while on antibiotics is even of more concern. Please contact your provider immediately.
LUK
posted: 9·25·2007



Subject: "Radiation / Side-effects"

Question:
What are some side effects of radiation treatment?

Answer:
Please see our web page on Radiation Treatment found at Radiation Therapy. It provides an overview of side effects of radiation treatment. You may also want to order a free booklet from the National Cancer Institute called, "Radiation Therapy and You: Support for People with Cancer" by calling 1-800- 422 - 6237 or you can view the booklet on line at www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/radiation-therapy-and-you
AB
posted: 7·28·2007



Subject: "Radiation"

Question:
Are there any kind of treatment options for red scalp irritation? Are there any kinds of ointments or creams that I can use to reduce the pain?

Answer:
If the irritation is from radiation, ask the radiation nurse to take a look at it and suggest something you can use. They may even have some samples on hand. Usually baby shampoo and Vitamin E or Aloe Vera cream is recommended. If it is not related to radiation, be sure to contact your healthcare team for management ideas.
JSK

More information on dealing with the side effects of radiation therapy can be found on our site at Radiation Therapy JSK
posted: 4·2·2007


Questions & AnswersTop of Page

Subject: "Treatment / Surgery"

Question:
I had a lumpectomy in 2003 and I just went to the chiropractor yesterday for a pinched nerve in my neck. He took x-rays and he found that I still have 6 staples inside of me. Is this normal?

Answer:
Surgical staples are not meant to be removed and do no harm in your body. A pinched nerve should be assessed with an MRI though because regular x-rays do not show where the nerves are affected.
JSK
posted: 12·10·2007


Questions & AnswersTop of Page

Subject: "Miscellaneous"

Comment / Question:
I have what looks like broken blood vessels on lower legs after much walking, type 1 diabetic.

Response:
We are unable to help you with skin problems we cannot see.

We suggest you see a health practitioner to diagnose your symptoms. It could be something as simple as dilated veins from heat and walking, or varicose veins or something more serious, such as poor circulation to your feet and legs. DD
posted: 6·6·2012



Subject: "Miscellaneous"

Comment / Question:
I wear tummy control underwear that happen to be nylon, now I feel a burning sensation down there, could it be my underwear that is causing this burning pain?

Response:
Yes, could be a yeast infection which can have burning and itching. Cotton panties are best.
JSK
posted: 6·6·2012



Subject: "Miscellaneous"

Comment / Question:
The MESOTHREXATE INJECTION it can be using for abortions?

Response:
It (methotrexate) can cause an abortion if given when one is pregnant, so it is not given to pregnant cancer patients. Methotrexate is NOT used to induce an abortion by anyone.
LUK
posted: 10·19·2011



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Side effects"

Comment / Question:
What are the side effects if you take folic acid pills?

Response:
Folic Acid, one of the B-complex vitamins, is used to maintain healthy cells, especially red blood cells, and to prevent spinal cord birth defects. When taking normal doses, there are rarely any side effects. Occasionally a serious allergic reaction can occur, but this is very uncommon.
LUK
posted: 3·22·2008



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Spiritual Beliefs"

Comment / Question:
Tell me about grieving process on cultural and spiritual impact on persons when someone dies.

Response:
Information on end-of-life and grieving can be found on the Palliative Care section of our website at http://natamcancer.org/palliative.html. There are sections of information on the effect of these issues on the body, mind, emotions and spirit. Tribes have many different cultural and spiritual ways of addressing end-of-life. You will find the experiences of several people from different tribal heritages, expressing their stories, traditions and beliefs.
AB
posted: 3·6·2008



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Help and Support"

Comment / Question:
I am doing a paper for school on the end of life issues that face members of the Mohegan tribe. Would you have any information on that? Thank you, J

Response:
We do not have information specific to the Mohegan tribe. The best place to obtain the information you seek is from the Mohegan tribe and elders. They have an excellent website http://www.mohegan.nsn.us/ on which you can search for information. Contact information is available on their website as well. When you contact the tribe be prepared to share more information, such as if you are a tribal member yourself, why you have chosen this topic to study, and why you have chosen to seek this information for the Mohegan tribe rather than other groups. You may also want to ask to have your paper reviewed by the tribal spiritual leaders or elders to see if you have accurately reflected the information you have learned. You should also offer to make adjustments that are recommended to you and to provide your completed paper to the tribe to post on their website if they wish.
AB
posted: 3·6·2008



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Help and Support"

Comment / Question:
I live in Manchester, Tennessee. My sister-in-law has colon cancer. Her Husband's plant closed down. His unemployment has run out and there are no jobs. She starts her treatment Monday for 6 weeks. She travels about 70 miles around trip. Where can I go to get help with gas and every (thing) else she needs? I don't know what to do. Need help. Thank-you.

Response:
Please take a few minutes to read through our Help and Support Branch of the Quality of Life Tree. You may want to contact three main potential sources of help and support for your sister-in-law. First try calling the American Cancer Society. Their national number is 800-ACS-2345. They can give you the direct number to call for your nearest local chapter of the ACS. Many ACS offices have volunteers who will assist with driving cancer patients to and from treatment and some have funds to assist with gasoline vouchers. Secondly, try calling 2-1-1 or (800) 454-8336. Either of these numbers will bring you to Tennessee's Comprehensive Information and Referral Source and they are aware of resources available in your community. Lastly, the Lance Armstrong Foundation has a partnership with the Patient Advocate Foundation and CancerCare Organizations. The resources of these three organizations can be reached by calling one number: 1-866-235-7205. They may be able to provide some support and financial assistance. For more information on these and other resources go to http://www.natamcancer.org/resources.html
AB
posted: 3·6·2008



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Help and Support"

Comment / Question:
Where can I find the information on disability as it relates to cancer?

Response:
This is an excellent question and we are working on a section to address this issue on our website. However, until that is available, a very helpful tool to use is a fact sheet produced by the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The fact sheet explains how cancer and its treatment can cause disability, what is considered a disability and provides a lot of information on employment rights. The whole subject of claiming a disability can be very complex. The fact sheet found at www.eeoc.gov/facts/cancer.html explains the guidelines and gives clear examples to help understand the process. If you need help with the legal aspects of this process you may also wish to click on the "Legal" leaf (Rick please make the word Legal a live link to the legal leaf on the help and support limb, resources branch.) for information on organizations to which you can turn for help and guidance in pursuing a claim.
AB
posted: 12·10·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous"

Comment / Question:
What was the leading cause of death among Native American people?

Response:
The leading cause of death among Native Americans is Cardiovascular Disease or in other words, Heart Disease and Stroke. The National Library of Medicine has an excellent website that covers health issues in American Indians. This website can be found at http://americanindianhealth.nlm.nih.gov/ It has sections (found on the left side of the website) covering many of these health issue with links to very helpful information.
AB
posted: 12·10·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Spirituality / Energy Natural Healing"

Comment / Question:
I have trouble keeping my energy level up now that I am a mom and a full-time student. Is there any simple moves or things I can do to lift my levels of energy throughout the day?

Response:
Yours is an excellent question to take to your health care provider. Stretching and physical activity can often help restore lost energy but it is important to check with your health care provider to ensure there is not an underlying medical or nutritional concern. With your provider's approval you may wish to explore Tai Chi or Yoga as ways to reduce the stress of new parenting and school work and to help restore your energy levels. As a student, there may be resources on campus for learning these techniques to practice at home
AB
posted: 10·17·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Caregivers: Daily Living Skills"

Comment / Question:
My family has been split apart after the death of my sister. There is great deal of anger directed toward my brother- in- law. My siblings believe he was verbally abusive in the latter stages of my sister's cancer. Can you direct me toward information about how a caretaker might behave poorly because of the fears and frustration in dealing with a dying spouse of twenty years? I would like to help my family re-unite after years of keeping there head in the sand and not dealing with this.

Response:
After a cancer death, one way that people can cope with grief is to try to understand the cause or reason for a loved-one's death. Even though your family members may know that your sister died of cancer, in grief, they may have assigned the blame for her death from cancer, which they could not stop or control, to your brother-in-law, who at times may have been unkind. Years ago, and still today in many communities, those who cared for a loved one with cancer had very little support. It was and in some native communities still is not acceptable to talk about cancer in the community or even within families. This dynamic makes the task of being a caregiver a most difficult role, one that is very lonely, frightening and demanding in ways difficult to understand. Those difficulties certainly could have caused a spouse to become frightened and angry in a way that caused him to take out those feeling on the one person he most loved and with whom he was most safe-his dying wife. Today, there are many more sources of support for caregivers and family members of people with cancer than there were back then. Much more is known about the toll cancer can take on a relative who is a full- time caregiver. (see helpful strategies on being a family caregiver page127.html) There are organizations such as hospice that can come in and help the family and the caregiver. There are also many publications now available that discuss the challenges of being a caregiver and provide ways of helping the caregiver cope with those difficulties. Perhaps some of the information in the publications/links below will help you to help your family understand and forgive your brother-in-law who may also be struggling to forgive himself. The following resources for caregivers are available on line and also can be ordered free of charge from the National Cancer Institute by calling 1-800-422-6237.

When Someone You Love Is Being Treated for Cancer:
This booklet is for caregivers - family and friends helping a loved one get through cancer treatment.

Caring for the Caregiver:
An easy-to-read version of NCI's When Someone You Love Is Being Treated for Cancer that addresses communication issues and physical and emotional coping skills for the friend or family caregiver of a cancer patient.

Facing Forward: When Someone You Love Has Completed Cancer Treatment:
The focus of the booklet is to provide care givers with coping strategies to help them shift their focus from treatment to recovery. Discusses the transition to a "new normal," communication skills and feelings, ways to get support, helping with follow-up care, and the need for self-care.

When Someone You Love Has Advanced Cancer: Support for Caregivers:
This booklet is for caregivers of loved ones with advanced cancer that is no longer responding to treatment. This booklet explores many of the questions and crossroads caregivers may face.
AB
posted: 10·17·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Spirituality / Traditional Healing"

Comment / Question:
How is traditional healing done?

Response:
A description of how traditional healing is done can be found on our web site at page119.html. This information also includes a description of key beliefs held by traditional healers and some cautions to be aware of when seeking a traditional healing ceremony.
AB
posted: 10·17·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Reconstructive Surgery / Side Effects"

Comment / Question:
How long after tram flap surgery does swelling go down in abdomen?

Response:
Tram flap surgery is a type of reconstructive surgery following mastectomy in which tissue from another area of the woman's own body is used to reconstruct the breast that has been removed. There are several types of tram flap procedures and each has different timing for healing and reduction of swelling. It is important to discuss any concerns about swelling with your surgeon who is most aware of the procedure that has been performed as well as your own medical history and overall health that can greatly affect your healing process. The Well-Informed Patient's Guide to Breast Reconstruction can be found on the web at www.mdanderson.org/Diseases/BreastCancer/reconstruction/ This resource from the MD Anderson Comprehensive Cancer Center points out the length of time that overall recovery can take "During normal activities, a woman who has undergone breast reconstruction with autologous tissue should not be uncomfortable; however, she should not expect to feel completely normal during exercise until one to two years after the surgery."

posted: 8·27·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous"

Comment / Question:
Is it possible that you may be pregnant even if you came on your period?

Response:
In general it is not likely that a woman is pregnant if she has a period. However, it is also not unusual for a woman to have some spotting of blood around the time her next period would be due, even if she's pregnant.

So, the answer is that yes, it's possible, but not likely. But you should check with your health care provider. If you're trying to get pregnant, there are some things you should do (and not do). And if you don't want to be pregnant, then you should learn more about family planning methods - and preventing sexually-transmitted infections.

Finally, if you have diabetes and are trying to get pregnant (or are just not using birth control), you should make an appointment to talk with your diabetes doctor soon about what you need to do to have a safe pregnancy and healthy baby. DD
posted: 8·27·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Additional Health Problems"

Comment / Question:
Is there a site like this for Native Americans who are affected by heart disease particularly stroke? It would be good to have this too if there isn't one already?

Response:
Thank you for this comment. We have done extensive searching and not found a similar site for Native with heart disease and stroke. Yours is an excellent suggestion. If anyone becomes aware of such a resource, please let us know by providing the information in the comments box of our website. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has produced an American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet that you can find at www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/library/pdfs/fs_aian.pdf
AB
posted: 7·28·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Side-effects"

Comment / Question:
I am taking 1 diltiazem 60mg tablet everyday for my blood pressure. I started this 2 days ago and I feel weak, like I'm going to pass out and I also have a slight headache. What I want to know is are these normal side effects to be having or should I be concerned?

Response:
For information about side effects you are experiencing from your medications, it is very important that you contact your health care provider. Your health care provider is aware of your personal medical information needed to provide medical advice and to manage your health issues. When you are concerned about possible side effects of a medication, another excellent resource people often forget about is the pharmacist. You can start by trying to contact the pharmacy where you got your medication. However, if they aren't open when you have a question, look in the Yellow Pages of your phone book under "Pharmacy" for the number of a pharmacy that advertises they are open 24 hours. Call and ask to speak to the pharmacist. You don't have to tell them whether or not you got your prescription filled there. Just go ahead and ask your question. You may also want to tell the pharmacist about any other medications you are taking at the same time so he or she can tell you if there are any that shouldn't be taken together.
AB
posted: 7·23·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Will"

Comment / Question:
I was thinking about a will and how it sounds good to me because my Grandfather didn't leave a will and the immediate family lost a lot of land to other family members who don't know the quality that meant so much to my Grandfather. I know he's turning in his grave at the way things turned out. How old should one be to write a will? No one knows when their time comes except the Creator, so I'm guessing the sooner the better but would one be able to add to it or update every so often?

Response:
Any adult of sound mind is entitled to make a will. It is also a good idea to periodically review and update it to reflect your current circumstances. The American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) web site refers their readers who have questions about drafting wills to the website below: www.nolo.com/article.cfm/

This link will bring you directly to the section about drafting a will. It includes answers to frequently asked questions about drafting a will and explains what needs to be done to create a legal will and discusses when you should consider changing your will and how to go about it.

Another excellent new resource, prepared in 2006 by a committee of young Texas attorneys, is intended to be an informative resource upon which you or your loved one can rely to answer legal questions like,

  • Am I entitled to time off work?
  • Should I have a will?
  • How do I tell my doctors that I don't want to be placed on life support if my condition is terminal?
Each attorney who helped prepare this Guide has been personally touched by cancer in some way - whether through family or after personally fighting the battle- and drew upon those experiences while preparing this guide. It is based on Texas law but gives a good place to start for all when addressing legal issues affecting those with cancer. It can be found at www.tyla.org/pdfs/CancerGuide06.pdf AB
posted: 7·2·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Questions"

Question:
MY BLOOD SUGAR HAS BEEN OVER 600 FOR 5 HOURS NOW

Response:
A blood sugar of 600 is dangerous. You must get to your health care provider today. Anytime your blood sugar is higher than 300 and doesn't come down in a matter of hours, you need to see your health care provider. Please be aware that this site and it's section for comments is not intended for or able to give direct medical advise. This is an education and awareness site and should not used for direct medical advise such as in this situation.
AB and DD
posted: 5·31·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Questions"

Question:
What does, "questionable etiology of a complex nodule in the lower endometrial canal mean"?

Answer:
This appears to be a phrase from a pathology report. Basically, what is being said is that a definite diagnosis cannot be made. The nodule (lump) could be cancer, but it also might not be. Generally more tests are done to make a diagnosis. It is important that the patient have all the scheduled tests so that a definite diagnosis can be made.
LUK
posted: 4·10·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Questions"

Question:
What does it mean when the stool is not solid, but flaky?

Answer:
This situation is probably not related to cancer but more likely related to your eating habits. More information on dealing with gastrointestinal issues during and after cancer treatment can be found at: http://www.cancer.gov/Gastrointestinal Issues

If you experience constipation, you may want to keep the following tips from the American Cancer Society in mind:

  • Drink plenty of fluids. Warm and hot fluids work especially well.
  • Eat a lot of high-fiber foods. High-fiber foods include bran, whole wheat breads and cereals, raw or cooked vegetables, fresh and dried fruit, nuts, and popcorn.
  • Get some exercise. Simply getting out for a walk can help, as can a structured exercise program. Be sure to check with your doctor before increasing physical activity.
  • As always, be sure to check with your healthcare team before making any major changes to your diet or physical activities or if any symptom, such as constipation or diarrhea continues or becomes worse. JSK, AB and LUK
posted: 4·2·2007


Subject: "Miscellaneous / Lymph Nodes"

Question:
Does a person have to be diagnosed with cancer to have a lymph node removed?

Answer:
No. People can have enlarged lymph nodes for a variety of reasons including infection and cancer and removal helps makes the diagnosis - and may rule out cancer. Sometimes the lymph node doesn't provide the diagnosis, but it's one way to find out what is going on.
posted: 1·24·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Questions"

Question:
Why the causative agent creates cancer to particular cell although it is distributed to different part of body?

Answer:
We are in the process of updating the risk factor information and how agents affect body (somatic) cells. This will be added to the "Get on the Path to Breast Health" new interactive program - but not until late spring 2007. In the meanwhile, the National Cancer Institute includes scientific explanations for this phenomenon on their website.
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/
posted: 1·24·2007



Subject: "Miscellaneous / Questions"

Question:
What type of cancers frequent Native Americans?

Answer:
The types of cancer that most affect American Indians and Alaska Natives vary by tribal Nations and geographic regions. Natives living in the Northern Plains (SD, ND, NE) and Alaska Natives have cancer rates similar to non-Natives (i.e., much higher than for Natives who live in the southwest or northeast). But all types of cancer are continuing to increase among Natives regardless of where we live. Thus, the reduction in cancer reported by the federal agencies for all populations is not being seen in Indian Country. A few examples follow: Alaska Natives have the highest colorectal cancer deaths in comparison with all other racial groups of the US. Cancers that are caused by habitual commercial tobacco use-related (e.g., Lung, esophageal, head, neck, cervix, prostate) are much higher among Northern Plains Indians in comparison to other communities living in the same areas and also in comparison with other geographic regions of the US. Southwestern Natives have elevated deaths from stomach and gallbladder cancers. So, as you can see, the types vary greatly by geographic region. I will include a few slides from the Indian Health Service Epidemiology Program (thank you David Espey, MD and Roberta Paisano, MHA [Laguna Pueblo Tribe]) to help you see how our cancer death rates vary among tribal Nations.
LB



posted: 1·24·2007


Subject: "Miscellaneous / Questions"

Question:
I found your site while "googling" information on non-medical pain management. I am a chaplain and grief support services coordinator for a Hospice in ___. I am interested in learning more about your organization. I am new to this role. I am not sure how many persons of Native American origin we serve, but my understanding is the more understanding I have of other cultures and peoples, the better I can be of service to those around me.

Answer:
I am glad you found our information. Please note that we are very close to uploading the palliative care (within the Treatment Branch) onto the NACES QOL Tree. We are also close to uploading resources to the Resource Branch. I did not include your city in the comment above to protect privacy. There are many Natives in your region of the country and in general, we have little to no access to Hospice Services. Most of our chronically ill or dying Native cancer patients have a family member who has little to no medical background providing the care. This is so very challenging. Our people primarily live in poverty, have no insurance, or insufficient insurance. We have been fortunate to have a few nurses from your region go out (on their own) to Native peoples' homes and help teach the family caregiver how to do some basic things to help relieve discomfort, etc. We are also very fortunate to have some Natives starting a cancer survivors' support program in your state. I'm certain they would love to meet with you and perhaps you can collaborate to help improve the Native cancer patient and family members' experiences to increase dignity and improve quality of life until the Creator decides to invite us to join Him. You may reach me at Native American Cancer Research. I frequently cannot get through my emails for several days, particularly when out in areas with limited connection or when I am in meetings that begin early a.m. and end late p.m. So please be patient for me to respond.
LB
posted: 1·24·2007


Questions & AnswersTop of Page

Subject: "Comments / Help & Support"

Comment:
Just wanted you to know that from time to time, I have "gone to the leaves" for personal instruction and have found it to be so much more informative than the information I receive from my healthcare providers. Mainstream information is not so "put together" or "comprehensive" as some would think - so muddy. The site is holistic and gets right to the point. I could go on and on but do want to finally say from my "written" breath, Many Thanks for being there for me in so many aspects of my journey - you'll never know. I am getting better as each day enfolds.
De-toxing from chemo is a daily reminder and blessing of the struggle (hasn't been too bad), being a survivor, having true supporters, and having access to modern -medicine. I am priviledged (spoiled) to have access to the advances in health care that I do, and to be working in the same building I had my chemo and rad. My hair is about the height of a pencil eraser now - in varying shades of gray. I've stopped wearing head covering and it's weird for me. I think it has helped me move on.
Dana
posted: 4·12·2009



Subject: "Comments / Help & Support"

Comment:
I was searching internet for research organsion on phototoxicity after using accelorator tan, containing benzyl salicylate (perfume carrier, but akin to aspirin), when using artificial sunbeds. I came across your sight. I am English with a touch of ancestoral Irish, living in England. For 14 months now I have suffered from Myeloma (bone marrow cancer). Reading about the high percentage of cancer cases in US non-white americans, I am discovering there IS a very high percentage of white skinned British/English people. Now living in this world of cancer, I find every third person I speak to has a relative with cancer. I believe that this high percentage of cancer in the UK is hidden within statistics, as when official statistics are published are in the media, it always relates to one specific cancer, not cancer in general, whether it be oncology or heamatology. I submit this, as I thought it may be of interest. KA

Responce:
Hello, KA. Glad you found our site and thank you for sharing your thoughts.

The use of tanning bed is linked with an increased risk for skin cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, "People 35 or younger who used the beds regularly had a melanoma risk eight-fold higher than people who never used tanning beds. Even occasional use among that age group almost tripled the chances of developing melanoma."

The following links will provide information:

www.cancer.org/docroot/NWS/content/NWS_1_1x_Tanning_Beds_May_Increase_Skin_Cancer_Risk.asp

www.skincancer.org/artificial/index.php

Also, if you are looking for further information and support for your myeloma you and our other readers may want to check out the International Myeloma Foundation's website at: http://myeloma.org/
They have a toll free international hotline.

Thanks again for writing and best wishes!
AB
posted: 6·13·2008



Subject: "Comments / Products"

Comment: (question)
How can I order the products? Victor

Response:
We have many materials that can be downloaded free of charge. These are listed on the bottom right hand corner of the "Home" page www.natamcancer.org/index.html. There are also handouts and articles available for free download at www.natamcancer.org/handouts.html. If you are looking for specific materials or products please submit another comment describing them and we will try to send you in the right direction.
AB
posted: 6·13·2008



Subject: "Comments / Spirituality"

Comment:
Spirituality is not only about meditation, though I tend to take a minute of my day to do so. It is basically the way I feel towards the world around me-therefore, the connection I share with it. When I am out horseback riding, for instance, I feel intact with the world, I am in awe. This moment is brief but it is intense and I frequently find myself seeking this feeling. It is sometimes a sense of wonder in both question and admiration that triggers me to feel this particular way. This feeling unifies me to the environment and (it is as) though I am part of it.
posted: 3·6·2008



Subject: "Comments"

Comment: (question)
When and where is the next Native Peoples Circle of Hope?
I would like to attend and need to get the information to my work for upcoming conferences.

Response:
Please look for information about conferences on the "Announcement" Tab of our website. Information about the next conference will be posted shortly. The conference will be held in Salt Lake City, UT in November of 2008.
AB
posted: 3·6·2008



Subject: "Comments"

Limb: Resources / Medical Bills

Comment:
Thank you for this site, my wife is Hawaiian and every time we looked for help they tried to ri us off or sell us something. This is the first site that gave me information I could use . . . again thank you.

Response:
This is a great web page comment. Thank you.
EG
posted: 10·8·2007



Subject: "Comments"

Limb: Spirituality

Comment:
Thank you for your website. I discovered it tonight and it's what I needed to read to receive guidance. I am a meditation facilitator and today held the first group for cancer patients, their friends and families. I myself had breast cancer 3 years ago and my journey has brought me here now. My birth father was from Native American roots. My mother is Scottish. I now live in Australia. The medicine is becoming stronger and stronger in me and today during a session I had with a spiritual intuitive, she said a Native American guide initiated me into something today while she worked on me. Saint Peregrine has stepped forward to offer guidance in my work and I feel that the time is now. Thank you for reaffirming this.

Warm regards, love, light, acceptance and laughter through difficult times. (PX)

Response:
Greetings to our reader(s) in Australia. So good to hear from you about your journey and thank you so much for sending us your comment! Stay Well!
AB
posted: 7·2·2007



Subject: "Comments"

Comment: (question)
I have a question... Do you mean we are able as educators in a hospital setting or other meeting places to distribute this breast health literature as long as you are given credit? I find this info extremely good and would love to use it in the future. Please advise. BL (email removed for confidentiality)

Response:
Yes, the resources on our website may be used free of charge. We do request that credit be given to Native American Cancer Research, Corp. when presenting these resources. We are glad to know that you are working as a partner in this important effort. Although we don't require it, we would love to hear about how, when, where and with what audience you are using the information. Speaking for our team, we all work very hard and put much care into what we do. It helps keep us going strong to hear your feedback and to hear how you use the materials. It also helps us to be able to report the reach of our services to our funders.
AB
posted: 7·2·2007



Subject: "Comments"

Comment:
This was very helpful to me. I have lung disease. Remission is the goal. My lymph nodes are affected by it. I have chronic fatigue and pain, that even with medication, is still there. People do not understand the pain. I am going to start some of the things you listed like the dairy or log of what happens or how I feel. Thank you for the very informational site.

Response:
Thank you so much for your feedback. We are all very glad to hear that you find the suggestions and information on our site to be helpful in finding ways to manage your pain and hope things are improving for you.
AB
posted: 4·10·2007



Subject: "Comments"

Comment:
I've got breast cancer. I had surgery one week ago. Tomorrow I find out the results of all the tests done on the tissues removed. I had renal cell cancer 35 years ago and I survived it and it's never come back. I've had a lot of sickness in my life time, lots of emotional pain and scars due to the actions of others or the events of life. I've always been the giver, the caretaker, the one everyone depended on. My point is this, I'm tired. I'm tired of going through so much pain and I don't want to anymore. I am secretly greatly depressed even though I exude a positive attitude for others. I don't know what to do as I don't have a choice in the fact that I have cancer. I'm trying to take every thing as it comes and deal with it one day at a time. I've lived by that all my life and it seems I don't know how to do it any other way, maybe that's a good thing. My prayer is if God is going to leave me here to suffer the rest of my life I want Him to take me now. Then on the other side of my thought process I think if He leaves me here, He's not done with me and there is a purpose to be seen. There's just so many thoughts running through my mind and I'm afraid of the uncertainty of what life I have left.

Response:
Despite the challenges you face, you are choosing to cope with your feelings in some very healthy ways. First, you are seeking information and connection with others by visiting our website. Next, you took the healthy step of writing about your experience. Writing can help you clarify your thoughts, feelings, and concerns and to begin the very important process of reaching out and sharing with others. Another great strength you show us in your comment is your spirituality. Your search for meaning and conclusion that there is a purpose for your time, is an open door for the Creator to work in and with you, perhaps someday to help others through the cancer journey. To explore the "Spirituality" branch of our website at http://www.natamcancer.org/page87.html

It sounds as if you have always been the strong one and the giver. Now is the time to reach out and let others walk with you and help you through the cancer journey. One thing you may want to do is to connect with other Native cancer survivors. You can do this by calling our Native American Cancer Survivors Network at 1-800-537-8295. Our Native Advocates can provide you with further information and support, put you in touch with other Native Cancer Survivors, and even send you a calling card to allow you to call other survivors toll-free. AB
posted: 4·10·2007



Subject: "Comments"

Comment:
[I am a] full blood Navajo, 29 years old and I have stage 2a Breast Cancer. I am so thankful I found you all on the internet. God bless you!!

Response:
I am so glad you found the information helpful. A comment like yours is what makes the long hours worth the efforts of all of us who work on this page (Ed Gamito, Linda Krebs, Rick Clark, DeeAnn DeRoin, Jennie Joe, Caren Trujillo, etc.). You made my day! There is great work being done on breast cancer. Please note that we (NACR) partner with Native Peoples' Circle of Hope (NPCOH) in coordinating annual Native American cancer survivors' conferences. The 2007 conference will be early September in Minneapolis. We are in the process of seeking funds to support survivors' travel and conference registration. Please call Peg at 303-838-9359 for more information after March 1, 2007. Come on up and meet with other dynamic, healthy survivors! May the Creator protect you and your family and help you throughout your healing.

Stay well, Linda B
posted: 1·24·2007


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